Former CBS Chief Moonves Accused of More Sexual Misconduct

An internal investigation of former CBS chief Les Moonves has apparently turned up more evidence of sexual misconduct, as well as lying and destruction of evidence, throwing into jeopardy his $120 million severance package, according to the most recent reports.

Here is what’s known about the scandal so far:

Moonves, 69, largely credited with turning CBS around, was forced out in September, after The New Yorker published allegations from 12 women who said he subjected them to mistreatment that included forced oral sex, groping and retaliation if they resisted.

Moonves denied the accusations, though he said he had consensual relations with some of the women.

Lawyers hired by the network allege in a draft report that the TV executive committed “multiple acts of serious non consensual sexual misconduct” before and after he came to CBS in 1995. The report goes on to allege that he deleted numerous text messages and was “evasive and untruthful at times” under questioning.

Investigators claim they received reports about a network employee who was “on call” to perform oral sex on Moonves. Investigators also allege that he received oral sex from at least four CBS employees “under circumstances that sound transactional and improper to the extent that there was no hint of any relationship, romance, or reciprocity.”

The investigators say they interviewed 11 of the 17 women they knew had accused Moonves of misconduct and found their accounts credible.

The 59-page report is to be presented to CBS’s board of directors before the company’s annual meeting next week, according to reports.

The former CEO “vehemently denies having any non-consensual sexual relations. He never put or kept someone on the payroll for the purpose of sex,” according to reports.

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