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Articles Posted in Sexual Harassment

A cook who worked in a Disney-owned restaurant has sued Walt Disney Parks and Resorts for allegedly retaliating against her after she filed a sexual harassment complaint.

The woman, who prepared food at Hollywood Brown Derby in Disney’s Hollywood Studios in the summer of 2018, filed a federal discrimination suit in Florida’s middle district court. She alleged that a chef who supervised her harassed her, touching her inappropriately and making crude jokes.

Disney transferred the chef so that he no longer supervised the woman but then fired her after her other managers retaliated against her, the woman alleged in the complaint.

A Belleair Bluffs financial services firm is facing a lawsuit claiming wrongful termination on the basis of gender, disability and religious affiliation as well as allegations of sexual harassment.

The harassment claims target former Tampa Bay Lighting President Ron Campbell.

A former executive administrative assistant for Seminole Financial Services is suing the firm for back pay, front pay and compensatory damages in a lawsuit filed in Pinellas County Court Feb. 6. 

The allegations in the suit have not been tried and have not yet been proven.

The woman began working for Seminole Financial in 2001, but took a three year leave of absence to battle breast cancer from 2014-2017. She returned to the firm in 2017. After her return, she claims Campbell consistently made sexual innuendos in conversation.

Among those, she claims, Campbell frequently discussed his use of erectile dysfunction medication and, at one point, insinuated the woman take a hot shower with him.

When the woman brought the offending statements up with another female, she was allegedly told, “get used to it, Mr. Campbell is the type of guy that will smack you on your a** and go on with his day.”

In another instance, the woman said a female employee asked her if she kept rosary beads at her desk as “all good Catholic girls” do. The woman explained that she was not Catholic and then was told she had fallen out of “the flock.”

Eventually, the woman said she complained about the harassment, but her complaint was ignored. She then went to the another company executive and had a closed-door meeting to discuss her complaints, but was similarly dismissed with little recourse for her concerns.

When the woman learned she required another surgery to treat her cancer, the company informed her that they were removing her from the company’s insurance plan because she was costing them too much money.

The woman was subsequently terminated, she claims because of her medical disability, religious affiliation and in retribution for her complaints about harassment. The complaint argues that her termination violated the Florida Civil Rights Act.

Under the Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 (FCRA), Florida employers are prohibited from discrimination against employees on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, handicap, or marital status. When a Florida employee believes that they have been discriminated against at work, it may be possible to file an employment discrimination lawsuit.

What Are the Differences Between The Florida Civil Rights Act & Federal Laws? 

  • Company Size: Under federal law, an employer is defined as employing 20 or more people during any given year. In Florida, a company only needs to have 15 employees in order to be held to the strictest of employment laws.
  • Individual Liability: Due to the necessary company size under federal law, some Florida employers may not be individually responsible for certain statutes. The FCRA requires ALL employers to be liable for discrimination against persons seeking licenses, certificates, credentials, to pass an examination, or to become a member of a club, where those accomplishments are required in order to engage in a profession, occupation or trade.
  • The FCRA does not define disability or handicap.
  • The FCRA does address pregnancy.
  • Unlike federal laws, the FCRA discriminates against marital status.

Florida is an “at-will” employer, meaning an employer can terminate an employee at any time for any reason, except an illegal one, or for no reason without incurring legal liability. Likewise, an employee is free to leave a job at any time for any or no reason with no adverse legal consequences. All Florida employees need to understand what protections civil rights laws afford them. If you need help, our Florida Employment Lawyers at Whittel & Melton are here to assist you. We have the knowledge and experience to deal with all types of civil rights issues.

Employers can break the law in numerous ways. We can help you better understand the differences between what is unfair and what is illegal. 

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The owner and manager of a Plantation IHOP will pay $70,000 to settle federal secual harassment suit brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 

The owner denies he did anything wrong with female employee who said he repeatedly asked her for dates, kisses and sex. 

The consent decree requires the man, who owns the IHOP at 2 N. State Rd. 7 through his Swami Pancake company, to do three hours of one-on-one anti-sexual harassment/sex discrimination management training annually for three years. The man’s wife and assistant manager also have to go through the same training.

According to the EEOC suit, the employee worked at the man’s IHOP restaurant from October 2009 through October 2017. Throughout her time there, she claimed, she and other women there suffered from the man’s incessant, unwanted mating attention.

The man is accused of sitting in the restaurant parking lot and waiting for the woman to finish her shift in order to make sexual advances to her, invite her to dinner, or for sex, while she was isolated from other employees and customers, according to the suit. He is also accused of parking his car to block the woman’s car so that she could not drive her car. The suit claims he would yell, ‘Why won’t you kiss me?’ and threatened, ‘I won’t let you go home until you kiss me.’

It is illegal for a supervisor or co-worker to make unwanted sexual advances towards another person in the workplace. It is also illegal for a supervisor or co-worker to subject another person to hostile work environment based on sex.

Sexual harassment is usually thought of as unwelcome sexual advances. And while that is part of it, there is so much more that falls under the umbrella of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment can be comments of a sexual nature, sexual innuendos, lewd or sexist remarks, sexual jokes, questions or comments about intimate relationships, inappropriate comments about physical appearance, and viewing, showing or discussing pornography.

Some other examples of sexual harassment include:

  • Sexual assault or unwelcome physical touching that is sexual in nature
  • Proposing employment advances or hiring for sexual acts (“quid pro quo”)
  • Visual harassment by displaying sexually explicit objects, cartoons or pictures
  • Verbal abuse by sexually offensive comments and degrading words
  • Making sexual advances or propositions, physically or verbally
  • Making gender-related comments about a person’s appearance or mannerisms
  • Bullying someone using gender-related comments or conduct
  • Treating a person badly because they do not conform to gender roles
  • Emails with sexual innuendos
  • Supervisor or co-worker watching porn in the workplace
  • Supervisor or co-worker asking questions about your personal life or touching you inappropriately

In cases of sexual harassment, it is very important to keep detailed records of each offensive incident. Our Florida Sexual Harassment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton recommend making notes of the time, date and underlying facts of each incident, including any actions you or your company took, as well as copies of all related correspondence or complaints.

Florida laws require an employer to provide a workplace environment free from harassment. Likewise, once employers are notified about any harassment, they are obligated to rectify it. If your company fails to resolve the issue, your next step is to enlist the help of an attorney who can walk you through the process of filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). 

The law forbids retaliation against employees who report sexual harassment and/or object to or refuse unwanted advances. Retaliation may occur through wrongful termination, unjustified discipline, refusal to promote, demotion, reduction in hours or work, denial of a bonus or raise, transfer to a less desirable shift, or exposure to other less favorable conditions of employment. 

Our Florida Sexual Harassment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton are here to support you if you have been the victim of sexual harassment at work. We negotiate mediate, and litigate claims of sexual harassment and retaliation for employeers complaining of or objecting to sexual harassment. If you believe you are being sexually harassed at work, we urge you to discuss your concerns with us in confidence through a completely free consultation. Taking this first step can provide you with the knowledge you need as it pertains to sexual harassment laws and what can be done to protecting your rights as an employee. We are here to educate you about your rights and offer you sound legal guidance. 

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A pair of Las Vegas attorneys settled a federal legal malpractice lawsuit against a former Pure nightclub cocktail waitress, who claimed she was attacked by the son of a Caesars Entertainment Corp. executive and former Las Vegas mayor. 

The confidential settlement between the woman and the attorneys was reached Tuesday, just days before the case was set for a jury trial, according to court records.

The woman had hired the law partners to represent her in a personal injury case against a man who attacked her on Jan. 4, 2009 at Caesars Palace, where she worked as a cocktail server. The suit also named Pure and Caesars Entertainment as defendants. 

The 2014 lawsuit identifies resulted in the woman suing her attorneys on claims of legal malpractice, breach of fiduciary duty and deceptive trade practices. According to the suit, one of the attorneys had conflicts of interest when his firm was hired to represent the woman in the personal injury case.

The attorney was also representing a Pure executive in a tax evasion case at the time, according to the malpractice suit.

According to the malpractice suit, the defendants’ errors forced the woman to settle for $225,000, which was less than 5 percent of McKenna’s actual damages.

Another law firm helped the woman settle her personal injury case. She had hired the firm to replace her original attorney’s firm on the case after more than four years.

Pure Management Group fired the woman in 2012 “due to physical and cognitive disabilities resulting from her attack,” according to the lawsuit.

At the nightclub early one morning in January 2009, the man who attacked her asked the woman to sit on his lap, and when she “refused his advances and turned to leave, the man pulled her into his lap,” the lawsuit said. After he “lunged at her, placed his hands around her throat, and began choking and shaking her,” the lawsuit alleged, the woman “blacked out and fell.”

Your workplace should be a safe place where you can perform your job duties worry free. A workplace should never be a hostile environment where acts of violence are carried out by other co-workers, managers and owners, or persons from the outside.  However, the sad truth is that workplace environments can be dangerous and acts of violence including assault and battery, sexual assaults, and gun shootings do happen. When these acts occur, workplace injuries and fatalities can easily happen. 

Workplace violence may include:

  • Sexual Harassment
  • Intimidation and Bullying
  • Intentional Emotional Pain or Psychological Trauma
  • Sexual Assault 
  • Sexual Battery
  • Assault and Battery, including unwanted grabbing, pulling of hair, hitting, and punching

Many times, the above types of acts go unreported because employees are worried about losing their jobs. You should not have to endure working in an unsafe environment, and our Florida Employment Lawyers at Whittel & Melton can help you if you have found yourself in these types of situations.

There are certain industries that are more susceptible to suffering from workplace violence. Some industries where workers may be victims of workplace violence may include:

  • Bar and Nightclub Workers
  • Liquor store and convenient store employees working late night shifts
  • Health care workers in hospitals
  • Social workers
  • Prison Guards and Security Guards Workers
  • Maids and nannies
  • State and Federal Government employees
  • Firemen and Police officers
  • School Teachers, coaches, and administrative staff

Our Employment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton are here to help protect victims of workplace violence. If you have been a victim of a violent act in the workplace you may be entitled to recovery for medical bills, rehabilitation costs, future medical bills and prescriptions, loss of income, pain and suffering, emotional distress, and mental anguish. 

As with any type of workplace issue, such as sexual harassment or discrimination, if an employer became aware of a situation of a hostile work environment, but failed to further investigate, intervene, or otherwise address the issue, they may also be held responsible for the actions of an employee. Employers have certain duties to keep their employees safe, and when you are subjected to violence at work, you have the right to pursue legal action for justice. 

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On Thursday, numerous local government officials from 31 U.S. states pressured McDonald’s Corp’s to do a better job of protecting workers from groping, obscene comments and other forms of sexual harassment, adding their voices to an employee-led campaign that has seen walkouts at several stores.

In a letter to CEO Steve Easterbrook, 115 mayors, commissioners, city councilors and school board members asked McDonald’s to meet with workers, hear their stories and together craft tougher policies to effectively stamp out harassment.

The officials are part of an advocacy network called Local Progress.

MCDSMembers of the U.S. Congress have written similar letters and employees have ramped up pressure on McDonald’s at a time that the chain and other fast food restaurants have struggled to find and retain enough staff.

The letter said McDonald’s employees have filed more than 50 sexual harassment complaints with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Reuters could not verify this because EEOC complaints are not public.

When asked to comment on the letter, McDonald’s referred to its Aug. 28 statement announcing a new training program for safe workplaces, which has support from more than 2,000 franchisees.

“Together with our franchisees, we have a responsibility to take action on this issue and are committed to promoting positive change,” said Chris Kempczinski, McDonald’s USA president. “These actions are one more step we are taking to raise awareness at all levels of McDonald’s that will transfer both inside and outside the workplace.”

Workers and those organizing them are trying to pressure McDonald’s, the largest U.S. restaurant chain by sales, to boost wages and address violence and harassment problems at its roughly 14,000 U.S. locations, most of them independently owned.

On Tuesday, workers at a Los Angeles McDonald’s walked off the job to protest, saying retaliation for reporting sexual harassment is rampant and they have been excluded from policy discussions, according to organizers and news reports – one of several similar protest in the last year and a half.

Last year, McDonald’s started working with RAINN, the largest anti-sexual violence organization in the country, to improve its policies.

McDonald’s released an announcement in August that they were implementing an even broader program focused on mitigating violence, harassment, bias and bullying, to start in October.

McDonald’s says they are doing everything they can to stop sexual harassment. In a statement, the company said:

“We have strong policies, procedures and training in place specifically designed to prevent sexual harassment. . . . To ensure we are doing all that can be done, we have engaged experts in the areas of prevention and response.”

Fast food companies and other restaurants often try to blame illegal behavior on their franchisees. Franchise arrangements are where one company buys the right to use the branding, trademarks and products of a larger company in exchange for a fee and royalties on profits. Due to how corporate controls these restaurants, it can be somewhat murky when trying to identify the responsible party: the franchisee or the corporation.

The franchising company often has policies for everything from advertising to food preparation. Franchisees, however, usually do not have the same degree of established policies and procedures for things like hiring or investigating sexual harassment complaints. This can translate to mean that such complaints do not receive the response they should under the law. 

While McDonald’s has said in multiple statements that it has implemented trainings to prevent sexual harassment in its company, it remains unclear whether McDonald’s efforts have been passed down to the franchisees. 

Sadly, many fast food workers, or employees of restaurants, fail to realize that the sexual harassment they experience in the food industry is unlawful, or that they have any recourse when management ignores their complaints.

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On Sunday, Afton Williamson, star of ABC’s ‘The Rookie,” announced she would not be returning to the drama starring Nathan Fillion.

The Rookie actress says she was the victim of sexual harassment and racial discrimination.

The actress, who co-starred on the cop drama from showrunner Alexi Hawley (Castle), ABC Studios and Entertainment One, announced her departure from the show in a lengthy post on her verified Instagram account.

Williamson claims she experienced racial discrimination and racially charged inappropriate comments from the hair department as well as from the drama’s executive producers starting with the pilot and continuing throughout the show’s first season. What’s more, the actress says the harassment was reported to Hawley and the showrunner never passed it along to human resources. Her issues escalated into sexual assault during The Rookie’s wrap party, she said.

Sources say Entertainment One — the lead studio on The Rookie — launched and has an ongoing investigation into Williamson’s claims. It’s unclear if the investigation was opened before or after Williamson departed the show. News of her departure hit the press July 26 and sources say she made the decision to not return for season two a few days before that.

“The allegations involve a production from Entertainment One. In late June, eOne made us aware and informed us that they launched an investigation that is ongoing. The safety of working environments is a top priority for us, and we take this matter very seriously,” an ABC spokesperson said in a statement.

“We take claims of this nature very seriously. We have initiated an independent investigation which is ongoing and as such, it would not be appropriate to comment at this time,” eOne said in a statement of its own late Sunday afternoon.

Williamson’s full post from Instagram is below.

I will not be returning for Season 2 of The Rookie. I owe it to you my amazing fans to share the Truth. Throughout the filming of the pilot, I experienced Racial Discrimination/Racially Charged inappropriate comments from the hair department and bullying from Executive Producers. During the Season, it continued along with Sexual Harassment from a recurring guest star and the racist commentary & bullying from the Hair Dept. Head escalated into Sexual Assault at our Wrap party.The Sexual Harassment though reported directly to the Showrunner/EP remained undocumented and was not reported to HR as promised. The Hair Dept. Head was fired ONLY after the sexual assault and NOT for an entire year of outward racism/racially charged language and bullying behavior in and out of the Hair and Makeup trailer. HR protocol was never adhered to following the above reports given by me to my Showrunner/EP and an investigation was never issued for any of my claims. The only time I was asked to participate in an investigation was after a meeting I called in June following our Season 2 announcement. This meeting included the Showrunner and two other producers as well as my agent and SAG-AFTRA Union Rep. It was clear to all present in the meeting that the Showrunner had not shared my reports with the any of the producers. After my initial report of sexual harassment, I was assured that the actor would be fired. I was also asked to film with him the very next day as a courtesy to the script, even though we had not begun filming the episode yet. This actor reappeared on our call sheet at the end of the season, I was even written in scenes with him. I asked the Showrunner about this and he admitted to me that the actor had not been fired nor had he gotten HR involved. I was asked to return this season, and promised that “everything was handled.” The investigation hadn’t even begun and Season 2 had already started filming. I turned it down and I walked. Now is the best time in the world to be a woman and I have a platform so it’s time to use my Voice. Strength comes from within. It comes from Above. “Greater is He that is within Me than he that is in the world.”

Being able to work in an evironment that is free from discrimination and harassment of any kind is part of our basic human rights and freedoms. When unlawful conduct affects your employment, unreasonably interferes with your work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment, our Florida Employment Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton can help you recover financial compensation for your suffering.  

We routinely represent employees who have suffered discrimination based on their race, age, disability, taking of protected leave for medical reasons, or to care for a family member under the Family and Medical Leave Act, national origin, gender – including pregnancy discrimination and sexual harassment, sexual orientation, and religion. 

We can help with all types of workplace discrimination cases, including: 

  • Acts that occur before employment begins, like discriminatory hiring practices
  • Acts that occur during employment, such as discrimination in compensation, promotions, or other terms and conditions of employment
  • Acts that result from the taking of protected leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act
  • Acts that result in employment ending, such as wrongful termination
  • Any retaliatory actions employees face from their employers following a complaint about discrimination and harassment at work

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McDonald’s has been hit with another round of lawsuits from current and former employees who claim management brushed off or ignored their experiences of sexual misconduct at work.

The Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund, the Fight For $15 movement to raise minimum wages and the American Civil Liberties Union announced the charges Tuesday, shedding light on 23 new complaints against the fast food chain and two lawsuits stemming from previous allegations.

McDonald’s cooks and cashiers at both corporate and franchise locations say they reported instances of sexual harassment and assault to their supervisors, but were either ignored or mocked, according to the lawsuits.

A McDonald’s worker from Louisiana whose co-worker allegedly attempted to rape her in a bathroom stall, said “nothing has changed” since her colleagues first began speaking out about sexual harassment at McDonald’s three years ago.

The advocacy groups, joined by “Top Chef” host Padma Lakshmi, are expected to hold a press conference outside McDonald’s corporate headquarters in Chicago later Tuesday to support the workers and raise awareness of their fight.

In a letter addressed to Lakshmi on Sunday, McDonald’s stated it’s “committed to ensuring a harassment and bias-free workplace” and outlined recent efforts the company has taken to “create safe and respectful” workplaces, including a bolstered sexual harassment policy and a hotline for reporting complaints.

“In the next two months, McDonald’s and [the nonprofit Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network] will facilitate additional conversations with U.S. restaurant employees and other relevant external stakeholder groups to help inform and further strengthen our policy and trainings,” the company wrote in its letter to Lakshmi. “These conversations underscore our commitment to continuous improvement and being responsive to the changing needs of our business and employees — now and in the future.”

A spokeswoman for McDonald’s told HuffPost that the company did not plan to address the allegations publicly outside of its letter to Lakshmi. She noted that roughly 95 percent of U.S. McDonald’s locations are independently-owned franchises and do not fall under the corporate umbrella.

Of the 23 new complaints announced Tuesday, 20 of the charges were sent to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the three others were filed as civil rights lawsuits, according to a spokeswoman for Fight For $15.

Some of the workers say they were as young as 16 or 17 years old when they were subjected to sexual misconduct at McDonald’s and that their complaints resulted in their hours being cut or termination, according to the lawsuits.

Dozens of sexual harassment charges have been filed against McDonald’s since 2016.

According to a recent EEOC report, nearly 40% of women have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace. If you’re being sexually harassed at work, there is no need to suffer in silence. Our Florida Sexual Harassment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton are here to help you understand the laws set in place that protect your rights. Federal, state and local laws protect all employees from unwelcome sexual advances, threats, demands and propositions.

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The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Whittel & Melton secured an $80,000 settlement for a female bartender who was sexually harassed at an Italian restaurant in Orlando for over two years before being fired after complaining to the restaurant’s owner.

The bartender was regularly asked to go on dates, described to restaurant patrons as single and available to date them, subjected to sexual innuendo, and told to dress “sexy” and “date-ready,” among other things.

Under the settlement, the restaurant must conduct mandatory anti-harassment training for all employees and operate a telephone hotline for employees to report incidents of discrimination and harassment.

Sexual harassment in the workplace can affect both men and women, and may include some of the following actions:

  • Touching an employee or coworker inappropriately
  • Promising a raise or promotion in exchange for sexual or romantic activities
  • Engaging in uninvited “x-rated” conversations
  • Unwarranted provocative gestures

Sexual harassment can be a traumatic experience that not everyone is comfortable talking about. However, if you are experiencing such illegal behavior at work, you do not need to suffer in silence. Our Florida Sexual Harassment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton know that coming forward with a sexual harassment complaint is not easy. That is why we will be there for you and guide you through the legal process, so that the wrongdoer is held accountable for their unlawful behavior.

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The former executive pastry chef at Mar-a-Lago is suing President Donald Trump’s private club and two senior managers claiming he was laid-off in retaliation for reporting sexual harassment against two female chefs.

The ex-chef, who worked at the club in Palm Beach from 2012 to 2017, reported to the club’s human resources department complaints he received from two young chefs who said they had been targets of sexual harassment, including lewd text messages, by two married, high-level food and beverage managers, according to the lawsuit.

Mar-a-Lago’s management looked into the ex-chef’s claims and he was interviewed as part of the investigation, which resulted in both managers receiving written reprimands and apologizing to the women, according to the lawsuit. About six months later, in October 2017, according to the suit, the managers who were reprimanded then laid him off, saying the club expected to lose $2.5 million from charity fundraisers that were canceled in the wake of the president’s comments about a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that left one woman dead.

The man, who has also filed a federal employment discrimination action against the club, did not believe their explanation, saying in his complaint that at the same time the club was hiring more foreign guest workers than it had the year before, including pastry chefs.

As for the lag time between the managers’ reprimand and the elimination of his position, the man said in his federal complaint that he believed they “waited sufficient time to cover their tracks, and then retaliated against me.”

Trump routinely receives visas to hire foreign workers as housekeepers, servers and kitchen staff at Mar-a-Lago, as do other area resorts and businesses. Trump received visas for 78 workers for the 2018-19 season, up from 70 workers in 2017-18, when the man was laid off. During the 2016-17 season, Trump hired 64 foreign workers at his Palm Beach club.

The Civil Rights Act protects all employees from sexual harassment in the workplace. These laws also protect employees from retaliation. Retaliation often occurs when an employer punishes an employee for filing complaints regarding sexual harassment or discrimination in the workplace. There are various federal laws that protect against retaliation and establish the rights of “whistleblowers,” people who file complaints about unsafe workplaces.

In order to establish grounds for a lawsuit, retaliation must have a negative impact on your employment. If you have reason to believe that an employer, manager, or another person is retaliating against you in the workplace, our Florida Retaliation Claims Attorneys at Whittel & Melton can help. We can investigate your claim and help you learn whether retaliation is taking place. If you are indeed the victim of workplace retaliation, we will fight aggressively to obtain justice on your behalf.

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Eliza Dushku was written off CBS’ “Bull” after she confronted the series star Michael Weatherly about his behavior, according to a new report in The New York Times.

CBS confirms it paid a secret $9.5 million settlement to an actress this year after she accused the star of the hit show “Bull” of harassment.

The Times said when Dushku appeared on “Bull” last year, there were “well-developed plans” to make her a full-time cast member, but those plans allegedly ended after she came forward with allegations against the show’s star.

Dushku played a lawyer alongside Weatherly for just three episodes in season one. Dushku was written off the show within days of confronting Weatherly about behavior that made her uncomfortable. Among the allegations: he told “a rape joke” and said in “front of the cast and crew” he “would bend her over his leg and spank her.”

In another alleged incident on set, Dushku held up three fingers during a scene. She allegedly told investigators, Weatherly suggested she wanted a threesome with him and another male cast member.

The network agreed this year to pay Dushku a confidential settlement of $9.5 million, roughly the amount she would have earned as a series regular. Eight months later, when CBS investigators approached her, she allegedly told them: “My story is true and it’s really affected me.”

In a statement, CBS said: “The allegations in Ms. Dushku’s claims are an example that, while we remain committed to a culture defined by a safe, inclusive and respectful workplace, our work is far from done.”

Celebrities and normal everyday people can be victims of sexual harassment at work. If you have or believe you have become the victim of sexual harassment in a Florida workplace, you do not have to simply ignore it and move on. Sexual harassment by coworkers, managers, or employers is illegal and you have legal recourse to right these wrongs.

Sometimes, sexual harassment cases involve inappropriate comments or gestures. Other times, the harassment can be much more serious. It may involve someone being fired for illegitimate reasons or worse, sexual assault and battery. Our Florida Sexual Harassment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton have successfully handled all of these and we know how each Florida statute applies to particular sets of circumstances that arise in these cases. We know how to build you the strongest possible case.

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