Articles Posted in Discrimination Lawyer

According to the Labor Department, a $5 million settlement has been reached with chip maker Intel Corp. over allegations of pay discrimination against its female, African American and Hispanic employees. 

As part of the agreement, Intel will pay $3.5 million in back wages and interest. It is also allocating at least $1.5 million in pay adjustments over the next five years for U.S. workers in engineering positions. 

Intel said Tuesday that it is pleased to have resolved the matter and said it achieved global pay equality in January. 

Like many other tech companies, Intel employs mostly white and Asian men, especially in technical positions such as engineering. According to its most recent diversity report , 27% of its employees are women, 9% are Hispanic and less than 5% African American.

Across the board, studies show women are frequently paid less than men for performing the same job. While the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act are designed to prohibit such discrimination, pay disparity remains a problem for many Florida women, in part because the laws themselves include a number of procedural hurdles that must be cleared before an equal pay claim ever reaches a trial court.

Employees are supposed to be free from wage discrimination based on race, color, religion, gender, age, national origin, or disability. These rights are protected by the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Despite all these protections, there are many studies that document the significant wage disparities between men and women, and between white people and people of color. Sadly, this also means that the pay gap is the worst for women of color.

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender, and require that men and women be paid equally for equal work. There are very important differences in these laws, which is why you need to work with an experienced and knowledgeable employment discrimination attorney who knows the differences between the two, and can advise you on the best course of action for you lawsuit.

In order to prove a case of race or gender-based wage discrimination an employee must show that an employer treats workers differently based on race, color, gender, or national origin.

Race-based wage discrimination is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which states it is illegal for an employer to discriminate based on race. Race-based discrimination can be committed against an employee, or even someone who is applying for a job. Some examples of race-based discrimination includes: 

  • Pay rate
  • The decision whether or not to hire an applicant
  • Title
  • Promotion
  • Benefits

It is illegal for an employer to make an employment decision with regard to any of these terms of employment based on race, gender, color, or national origin. Race and gender-based discrimination does not necessarily have to be overt. An employer may have committed race or gender-based wage discrimination by implementing seemingly-neutral policies that disproportionately affect people of a particular race or gender.

A successful race or gender-based discrimination claim can include the following compensation: 

  • Back pay
  • Lost wages 
  • out-of-pocket expenses
  • Court costs and attorneys’ fees
  • Damages for emotional and mental anguish

Punitive damages, which are given out to punish your employer for violating the law. These are only awarded in situations where the employer acted intentionally or in a particularly egregious way.

With that said, many people facing discrimination in the workplace are scared to come forward out of fear of being retaliated against by their employer. Our Florida Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton want you to know that the law strictly forbids retaliation against employees for reporting illegal discrimination. If you have complained of discrimination or made a report to HR, and after you said something, your employer demoted or terminated you, or diminished your wages and/or benefits, you may very well have a claim for retaliation. To prove a claim of retaliation, you must prove that you suffered an adverse employment action because you complained about or reported discrimination.

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Did you know that in much of Florida, a person can be fired or not hired simply because they are gay, bisexual or transgender? 

Yes, blatant discrimination is still perfectly legal even after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled same-sex marriage to be legal more than four years ago. 

Currently, a bipartisan group of state lawmakers, backed by big business, is yet again trying to change that.

Multiple Tampa Bay-area legislators have introduced bills for the 2020 legislative session that would prohibit businesses from discriminating against their employees on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation.

Both Senate Bill 206, sponsored by Sen. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, and House Bill 161 would amend the state’s Civil Rights Act of 1992 to prohibit such discrimination. The act already prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age or handicap.

The bills also would prohibit businesses and landlords from discriminating for those same reasons, but the language allows for discrimination for religious reasons.

For nearly a decade now, lawmakers have tried to pass an anti-LGBTQ discrimination bill, but the efforts have not made headway in Florida’s GOP-controlled Legislature.

This leaves many questioning if this is the year change will happen. The public policy director for Equality Florida, created in 1997, which advocates on behalf of the LGBTQ community, said 60 percent of Floridians are protected from discrimination by ordinances passed by cities and counties, including Hillsborough and Pinellas and all three counties in South Florida.

The issue has widespread bipartisan support with recent polling showing nearly 70 percent of both Americans and Floridians back protections against anti-LGBTQ discrimination. Twenty states have already passed similar legislation.

Dubbed the “Competitive Workforce Act,” lawmakers are selling the legislation as not just the right thing to do, but as a way to lure businesses to Florida.

Some of the biggest political donors in the state, such as Disney and NextEra Energy, the parent company of Florida Power & Light, strongly support it. 

Those companies and more than 450 others have created a nonprofit to advocate for the bill, arguing that anti-LGBTQ discrimination costs the state an estimated $362 million a year in lost productivity, turnover and inability or difficulty recruiting employees.

Last year, the bills were co-sponsored by nearly half of all lawmakers, but Republican leadership in both chambers prevented the bills from getting a hearing in any committee.

Neither House Speaker José Oliva, R-Miami Lakes, nor Gov. Ron DeSantis responded to requests for comment about where they stand on next year’s bills.

Next week, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in three cases that deal with whether it’s legal to fire workers for their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Without statewide laws, being fired for being gay or transgender remains a real fear for many Floridians.

Discriminating against someone in the workplace due to their sexual orientation or gender identity is still a major issue in the United States, as this article points out quite clearly. Our Florida Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton firmly believe that no one should be discriminated against, regardless of who they are or what their sexual orientation is.

Examples of LGBTQ discrimination can include:

  • Being harassed by your boss or co-workers because of your sexual preference
  • Your co-workers or employer making derogatory comments about homosexual, transgender, or bisexual individuals
  • Being denied a promotion because of your sexual preference
  • Being treated differently by your boss because of your sexual orientation
  • Being denied insurance or other work benefits because of your sexual orientation

A federal appeals court recently ruled that the Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace discrimination against LGBTQ employees. While the court decided that “discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination,” there are still no federal laws that make it clear that LGBTQ discrimination in the workplace is against the law. Several states have passed bills to protect these workers, but most states are still without any type of anti-discrimination laws. 

The following states currently prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity:

  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Iowa
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Minnesota
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • Oregon
  • Rhode Island
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Washington

The following states currently prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, but not gender identity:

  • New Hampshire
  • New York
  • Wisconsin

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Seven employees at the Florida Department of Health clinic in Haines City have spoken out publicly regarding being harassed by management for speaking Spanish at work.

They say they have been made to feel like criminals for simply speaking Spanish. 

The seven nurses and clerks at the Florida Department of Health clinic in Haines City are outraged over their workplace’s attitude towards them speaking their native language to each other.

The women are all Puerto Rican and say they were hired because they are bilingual. Haines City does have a high Hispanic population. 

Despite this, they say management has forbidden them to speak Spanish to each other.

They claim the harassment intensified in the last year, but has gone on much longer.

The women filed a complaint with the Polk County Health Department and have also reached out to the Tallahassee office. However, they say no action has been taken.

Activist groups like Alianza for Progress have taken notice and are stepping in to support the women.

The Florida Department of Health has yet to make an official statement regarding these complaints. 

Being verbally abused, intimidated, and/or harassed at work can be incredibly stressful and traumatic. This creates what is better known as a hostile work environment, and many employees who experience this kind of abuse from their employer or a coworker often feel like they have no options to end their suffering. That is simply not the case, and our Florida Discrimination Attornyes at Whittel & Melton can help you understand how to resolve these issues. We see too many victims of hostile work environments feel pressured to either quit their job or suffer through continued harassment and intimidation, but we can help to find you other options. 

Discrimination is defined by Florida state and federal law as the unfair and often hostile treatment of another individual based on their race, color, sexual orientation, or personal characteristics. In regards to Spanish speakers, they are often discriminated against because of their ethnicity and their cultural background. In the state of Florida and throughout the United States, discrimination in the workplace is against the law. When off-color comments or harassment about race happen in the workplace, this creates a hostile work environment. 

A lawsuit can be filed against your employer if they are allowing discrimination and harassment in the workplace to happen and fail to do anything about putting a stop to it. Discrimination and harassment in the workplace can take on various forms, so it is imperative to find an attorney in Florida who understands the rights of employees to review your case. 

There are several elements that must be present when it comes to hostile work environments based on discrimination lawsuits against your employer, inculding:

  • It must be shown that your employer is discriminating against you based on your religion, disability, race, color, or age in some way.
  • It must be shown that your employer’s behavior and actions have lasted for an extended period of time. With that said, you cannot sue your employer for one off-handed comment. Any and all incidents where your employer created a hostile work environment should be documented, recorded and filed with your company’s HR department.
  • Your employer’s actions must be consistent and severe enough to affect your ability to perform your everyday work duties. 
  • If your company has done nothing to eradicate issues of abuse or harassment, then you can move forward with legal action against your employer.

If you, your co-workers, or anyone else you kow has been the victim of a hostile work environment based on discrimination, it is in your best interest that you seek legal guidance from our Florida Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Meton who can guide you on filing a lawsuit against your employer for creating and facilitating a hostile work environment. We are Spanish-speaking Florida lawyers who can fight aggressively on your behalf to achieve a successful outcome for your case.  

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An employee of Boeing at their plant in North Charleston who found a noose hanging above his desk earlier this year says the company knew about “an atmosphere of racial hostility and harassment towards African Americans,” according to a federal lawsuit filed last week.

The man says he worked at the South Carolina plant for eight years and complained several times about racism in the unit where he had been assigned since 2017, the lawsuit says.

The man, who is black, says white coworkers urinated on his desk and in his seat “numerous times” and used a racial slur daily, according to the court filing. When he complained about the harassment and racism, the man says he was moved to a different unit that did not have air conditioning.

The racism at the plant gained international notoriety earlier this year after the man found a noose hanging above his desk, according to the lawsuit.

Boeing released a statement saying that most of the man’s “allegations were never brought to the attention of management, giving the company no opportunity to investigate these claims. The single issue he did raise was dealt with promptly and in a fair manner.”

Boeing says it fired the employee who hung the noose in the sprawling factory where the company assembles the 787 Dreamliner.

The man had to take medical leave twice because of the effects of the racist environment in the plant, the lawsuit says.

In a statement, Boeing said there are no “no validity to his allegations.”

While the man remains a Boeing employee, he is currently out on family medical leave, according to the suit.

Federal, state and local laws strictly prohibit an employer from discriminating against an employee based on race. These laws protect employees from being treated less favorably than other employees, receiving fewer job or promotional opportunities, termination and more, strictly based on race.

Different Types Of Race Discrimination

There are two types of cases when it comes to race discrimination. The first type is disparate treatment/ hostile work environment cases, and the second type is disparate impact cases. Disparate treatment cases involve an employee who is intentionally discriminated against due to their race. Disparate impact cases involve an employee who is discriminated against by employment policies that negatively affect them because of their race.

Race discrimination can take a variety of forms. The following are just a few examples of how race discrimination in the workplace can occur:

  • An employee is treated differently than other employees based on their race, including harsher disciplinary actions
  • An employee is denied promotions, training, or other employment benefits due to their race
  • An employee has suffered retaliation for taking action against a discriminatory employer
  • An employee has suffered wrongful termination motivated by racial discrimination

Racial Harassment at Work

Hiring practices, intentional discrimination, and unfair practices are not the only ways employers can discriminate. Harassment is also a huge issue with regards to racial discrimination. A hostile work environment based upon race can also be terms for a case against your employer.

Race harassment can involve inappropriate humor, intimidation and even physical violence. Oftentimes, incidents start out small and escalate when not addressed thoroughly and aggressively enough. Challenging racial harassment at your workplace can be tough, but an assertive stance must be taken by your employer to make sure this type of behavior is noy tolerated.

Any co-worker can be a source of race harassment, from upper management to lower-level employees. While management may not be participating in the harassment,  if they are aware that it is occurring and do nothing to stop it, they can be liable for the harassment. Employers are obligated to protect their employees from race harassment, so failing to do so can make them just as guilty as the person(s) carrying out the harassment.

The Next Steps

If you do have a race discrimination or harrassment case,, the next step involves submitting a claim to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. This step is necessary, but can be overwhelming. Our Florida Workplace Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton can help with the submission and much  more.

Our discrimination and harassment lawyers know the impact that race harassment/discrimination can have on your self worth as en employee, which can negatively impact your work performance. We have the resources needed to help you protect your rights and remedy your current situation.

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The U.S. Soccer Federation has formally denied allegations of gender discrimination made by players of the U.S. women’s national team.

28 members of the current women’s player pool filed the lawsuit March 8 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, alleging “institutionalized gender discrimination” that includes unequal pay with their counterparts on the men’s national team.

The USSF claims every decision made “with respect to the conduct alleged in the complaint was for legitimate business reasons and not for any discriminatory or other unlawful purpose.”

The federation has maintained the differences in pay are the result of different collective bargaining agreements that establish distinct pay structures for the two teams. Those agreements are not public.

U.S. Soccer also maintained in the response that any alleged differences in pay between the men’s and women’s national teams were not based on gender, but “differences in the aggregate revenue generated by the different teams and/or any other factor other than sex.”

The USSF and the women’s team agreed in April 2017 to a collective bargaining agreement through 2021 that gave the players higher pay and better benefits.

The federation claims the allegations do not rise to the level required for punitive damages because there is no evidence of malicious, reckless or fraudulent intent to deny the players their rights.

The lawsuit brought by current national team players is an escalation of a long-simmering dispute over pay and treatment. Five players filed a complaint in 2016 with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that alleged wage discrimination by the federation. The lawsuit effectively ended that EEOC complaint.

It will be interesting to see how this case plays out, as it’s illegal for an employer to pay women a different amount than their male co-workers if they are working the same job and have the same level of experience and skill. As this case shows, there are two main federal laws that make it illegal to pay women less simply based on their gender. Title VII prohibits any workplace discrimination based on sex, race, or religion. The Equal Pay Act makes it illegal for an employer to pay women a different amount for substantially similar work.

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Four women have joined the class action lawsuit alleging discrimination against pregnant and breastfeeding AC Transit employees.

The transportation agency allegedly discriminates and fails to accommodate pregnant women who work for them.

On of the women says she was offered a room where she was told she pump breast milk when she returned to work after her first pregnancy in 2016 – it was an old closet she describes as dirty and that had no privacy.

The woman left her job as a bus driver and now gets paid less as an AC Transit clerk, all so that she can pump.

Another woman says the company makes it difficult for expecting mothers. She joined the suit after she fell asleep at the wheel and crashed her bus while pregnant. She says she asked for lighter desk work prior to the accident but was not accommodated.

So far, four women in total allege that AC Transit refused to accommodate their pregnancy or lactation needs and that they are in violation of their legal rights.

AC Transit released a statement saying that they work with new mothers and value the importance of women in the workforce, and that “it is important to note, modifications of duties can present logistical challenges given the nature of public transit. However, ac transit adopts an individual process that takes into account accommodation options for each new mom and her newborn throughout the first year of life.”

Juggling a family and work is no easy feat, especially for new moms. Seeking a balance between earning money and parental responsibilities can be quite difficult. There are laws in place that protect pregnant and nursing mothers in the workplace. Workplace discrimination based on pregnancy and nursing is illegal, and our Florida Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton can make sure that you know what your rights are and that they remain protected.

When your employer prevents you from pumping breast milk during work hours, it may violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Fair Labor Standards Act. Under FLSA, employers must provide breastfeeding mothers reasonable break time and a private space (other than a bathroom) to pump at work for one year following their child’s birth.

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Two female employees are suing Walt Disney Co., alleging the company is violating the state’s equal pay act and paying women less than men doing similar work.

The class action lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court and is covering people who worked for Walt Disney Studios in roughly the last four years.

Disney said the lawsuit was “baseless.” In a statement, the company said it maintains “robust pay equity practices and policies” and has a specialized team of compensation professionals and lawyers to address the matter. “We are confident that they [the claims] will be found to be meritless when tested against the evidence, rather than the rhetoric of the complaint.”

The lawsuit was brought by Southern California Disney employees. One woman works as a manager in product development for Disney in Glendale. In 2017, she raised the issue that she was not being compensated fairly, the lawsuit said. At the time, her base salary was $109,958. Six other men who held the same title were paid $16,000 to nearly $40,000 more, according to the lawsuit. Five months after she brought up the issue, the woman said, Disney asserted that her salary amount “was not due to gender,” but in November 2018, the company boosted her pay by $25,000, the lawsuit claims. Even with the pay adjustment, the woman believes she is still making less than men doing similar work.

The other woman works as a senior copyright administrator in the Disney Music Group in Burbank. She says she was discouraged from applying for a manager position that was later changed to a senior manager role and given to a man. The lawsuit claims that “he is making significantly more than the woman even though they are both performing the same or substantially similar work.”

Our Florida Employment Law Attorneys at Whittel & Melton are committed to helping bring about gender pay equality. There are laws in place requiring employers to pay women and men the same for equal work. These laws extend beyond salary, including bonuses and other benefits. If you are getting paid less than your male coworkers, we can help you understand your rights and achieve justice.

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A 25-year-old New York state middle school teacher has filed a $3 million lawsuit against her former employer.

She says she was fired because of a topless photo she’d sent privately to someone she was dating.

A student somehow got hold of the photo and began circulating it, but she says that’s not her fault and that she shouldn’t be punished for it.

She is now suing the South Country School District for that amount in a gender discrimination lawsuit because she was fired over the selfie last week.

She said she texted the photo to her partner at the time, another teacher in the district, more than two years ago.

She has no idea how a student was able to get a copy and share it.

It will certainly be interesting to see how this case progresses and its outcome. The main argument here is that no man would ever be fired for exposing his chest in a photograph, so why should a woman be fired for the exact same thing? Treating women differently than men in the workplace is absolutely a form of gender discrimination. No woman, or man for that matter, has to put up with gender discrimination in the workplace. Our Florida Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton can help you seek financial compensation for wrongs you have experienced in the workplace.

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An Orange County woman is suing a vacation business, alleging discrimination, retaliation and wrongful termination.

The woman filed a complaint Oct. 17 in Orange County Circuit Court against Wyndham Vacation Ownership Inc., alleging violation of the Orange County Civil Rights Ordinance and the Family Medical Leave Act.

According to the complaint, in February the woman requested leave due to complications with her pregnancy. Prior to returning to work on or around March 7, the suit says, she was terminated for alleged poor performance.

The woman says she has suffered lost wages and benefits, emotional pain and suffering, humiliation, inconvenience, mental anguish and loss of enjoyment of life.

She alleges Wyndham Vacation Ownership subjected her to pregnancy-based discrimination and harassment and retaliated against her by terminating her employment for exercising her rights.

In regards to pregnancy, it is illegal for an employer to discriminate against a woman because she is with child. State and federal laws protect women against this form of discrimination in all aspects of employment, including interviewing, hiring, firing and promoting.

Pregnant employees may suffer from a variety of medical conditions during pregnancy and after childbirth. It is illegal for employers to discriminate against these employees. Some examples of medical conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth include:

  • Back pain
  • Pre-eclampsia
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Any conditions that require bed rest
  • Lactation issues

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An Orange County driver is suing UPS, alleging racial discrimination and wrongful termination.

The man filed a complaint Oct. 4 in Orange County Circuit Court against UPS Ground Freight Inc., alleging violation of the Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992.

According to the complaint, the man’s employment with UPS Freight was steady for 17 years until the promotion of two other men.

After their promotion, the suit says, the man and other minority employees began to experience a pattern of harassment as he is Hispanic male of Puerto Rican descent and the two supervisors are white. Furthermore, the man alleges he was terminated for refusing to engage in an illegal activity.

He claims that UPS Ground Freight, despite receiving pleas for help from employees, failed to stop the harassment and allowed the discrimination and harassment to continue in the workplace.

The man seeks trial by jury, judgment for lost compensation, back pay, front pay, benefits with interest, attorney fees, costs and all other just and proper relief.

Congress enacted the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to ensure equality of employment opportunities. Now, more than half a century later, racial  discrimination in the workplace remains all too prevalent. Our Florida Discrimination Attorneys at Whittel & Melton are deeply committed to achieving the promise of the Civil Rights Act by aggressively fighting race discrimination in the workplace.

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