Working Women Share Stories of Sexual Harassment While on the Job

For “My Reality: A Hidden America,” a special “20/20” report by ABC News’ Diane Sawyer, women were asked to share their experiences with sexual harassment or abuse while on the job and responses were received from all over the country.

From truck drivers to waitresses to hotel room attendants, these women shared their stories of facing horrible situations at work, offered advice to others and discussed what they see as solutions to ending sexual harassment.

One woman who delivers packages for a local delivery company from a FedEx Ground facility in Sikeston, Missouri said that for years, she was ridiculed and bullied by her supervisor who she says tried to drive her out of the mostly-male workplace.

In 2016, she filed a complaint with the Missouri Commission on Human Rights and then with the EEOC. After a recent ruling, her federal harassment claims are moving forward. She’s asking for monetary damages, but she says most of all, a promise to create an environment where a woman can work with dignity.

Another woman, a waitress who was 16 years old when she got her first job as a hostess working at an IHOP franchise restaurant in Illinois said that she has been sexually harassed by two male managers.

It was only after she left the restaurant that she said she learned of 10 other women who had been working at the same franchise who claimed to have their own stories about sexual harassment and assault there. They have now filed a lawsuit against the franchise.

The franchise owner has denied all wrongdoing but gave “20/20” no further comment. The IHOP corporation said they are very concerned about any question of harassment in the workplace and hold their franchises to high standards.

One of the biggest things our Florida Sexual Harassment Attorneys at Whittel & Melton would like workers to know is that you don’t need to suffer in silence or worry that you’ll face retaliation if you come forward if you’re being sexually harassed at work. Workplace sexual harassment is illegal. In order to stop the abuse from continuing, we can help you take the proper steps to hold the employer accountable for their wrongful actions.

If you’re experiencing or have experienced sexual harassment, there are laws set in place to protect you. Federal, state and local laws protect employees from unwelcome sexual advances, unwanted sexual propositions, and working in a sexually hostile work environment.

Employers have a duty to keep their workplaces free from sexual harassment. If an employee reports sexual harassment and the company does not take the necessary action to stop it, the company can be held legally responsible.

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