Boeing and Airbus Group tooling supplier Electroimpact have been fined $485,000 after an investigation yielded it had a discriminatory hiring policy.

Boeing and Airbus use Electroimpact robotic machines throughout their jetliner factories, including to help make wings for their top-selling 737 and A320 single-aisle aircraft.

An investigation found evidence that Electroimpact and its founder refused to hire Muslim applicants and “engaged in religious and/or national origin harassment.”

Electroimpact founder Peter Zieve had the primary responsibility for screening applicants and conducting final interviews, according to reports.

About 95% of Electroimpact’s 474 engineers are white, the statement said, citing a report to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Electroimpact said that it did not conform to the personal views of its founder and that Zieve was no longer involved in the company’s hiring process.

Boeing plans to use Electroimpact machines to help make wings for its forthcoming twin-aisle 777X aircraft.

Other Electroimpact equipment is also used in construction and assembly of Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner carbon fiber composite fuselage sections.

Airbus in a statement noted the diversity of its team around the world and said it values the benefits that different cultures bring.

Despite federal and state laws put in place against discrimination based on religion or national origin, it still happens everyday in workplaces across the United States. The law makes it crystal clear that there is no legitimate excuse for discriminating based on religion or national origin. Our Florida Discrimination Lawyers at Whittel & Meton proudly help victims of someone else’s biases and prejudices in the workplace. If you are involved in such a situation, we can help you bring a claim against your employer to pursue financial compensation.

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The Walt Disney Co. has agreed to pay $3.8 million in back wages to Florida workers for violating minimum wage and overtime laws as part of an agreement with the U.S. Department of Labor.

The federal agency said last month that the back wages will be paid to more than 16,000 workers at the Disney Vacation Club Management Corp. and Walt Disney Parks and Resorts in Florida.

The department’s Wage and Hour Division says Disney deducted uniform expenses that caused some workers’ hourly wages to fall below the federal minimum wage.

The division also says Disney didn’t pay workers for duties performed before their shifts started and after their shifts ended.

The agency says Disney cooperated with their investigation.

By law, employees must be rightfully compensated for the services and labor they provide to an employer. Even salaried workers may be entitled to overtime pay, depending on the circumstances. Our Florida Unpaid Wage & Overtime Lawyers at Whittel & Melton can help you understand if you can collect any wages that you believe are owed to you.

We can help if you are seeking back pay for any of the following:

  • Illegal wage deductions
  • Violation of minimum wage laws
  • Unpaid overtime, bonuses, and tips
  • Delay in paychecks

When it comes to unpaid wages, it is best to keep a detail record of what your employer owes you. Your employer should keep their own records of hours employees worked and their wages. If your employer cannot provide these records to dispute your claims, then a court is more likely to side with the employee.

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Fox News star Bill O’Reilly and the network have paid out some $13 million to five women over the past 15 years to settle a series of harassment allegations against the opinionated host, according to the New York Times.

The settlements, three of which had been previously undisclosed, were in exchange for the women’s agreement not to sue the company.

O’Reilly – the top-rated attraction on cable news for many years – generated headlines in 2004 for his dispute with Andrea Mackris, who alleged that he had harassed her repeatedly while she was a producer of his program “The O’Reilly Factor.” Mackris settled her claims for a reported payout of $9 million in 2004.

In January of this year, O’Reilly settled another harassment claim, lodged by former Fox News presenter Juliet Huddy, for an undisclosed sum.

The Times found three other complaints and payouts involving O’Reilly, dating back to 2002.

Fox settled two of them, and O’Reilly privately settled a third in 2011. The latter agreement was so secret that 21st Century Fox was unaware of it until last year, the paper said.

Fox hasn’t said whether O’Reilly was ever disciplined as a result of the allegations.

O’Reilly’s statement, posted on his website, said:

Just like other prominent and controversial people, I’m vulnerable to lawsuits from individuals who want me to pay them to avoid negative publicity. In my more than 20 years at Fox News Channel, no one has ever filed a complaint about me with the Human Resources Department, even on the anonymous hotline. But most importantly, I’m a father who cares deeply for my children and who would do anything to avoid hurting them in any way. And so I have put to rest any controversies to spare my children. Those of us in the arena are constantly at risk, as are our families and children. My primary efforts will continue to be to put forth an honest TV program and to protect those close to me.

O’Reilly and Fox continue to face allegations by former Fox personality Andrea Tantaros, who claimed, in a lawsuit filed last summer, that O’Reilly sexually harassed her.

Sexual harassment in the workplace is illegal. Sadly, many employees fear taking because they are afraid of losing their much-needed jobs. Sexual harassment needs to be reported, though. In many cases, the harassment can escalate quickly and lead to a hostile work environment. When it gets to this point, you are unable to do your job and earn your living.

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A Maine dairy company recently learned how a comma can change everything. In O’Connor v. Oakhurst Dairy, it was shown that a comma can go a long way to avoid ambiguity.

In this case, a group of dairy delivery drivers sued Oakhurst, claiming the company failed to pay them overtime under Maine’s wage and hour laws.

Oakhurst argued that dairy delivery drivers are overtime-exempt under Maine’s “Exemption F.” Under Exemption F, Maine’s overtime law does not apply to:The canning, processing, preserving, freezing, drying, marketing, storing, packing for shipment or distribution of: (1) Agricultural produce; (2) Meat and fish products; and (3) Perishable foods.

The outcome of this case came down to whether the drivers engaged in “packing for shipment or distribution.” The drivers argued that this phrase refers to a single activity of “packing,” whether the packing be for shipment or for distribution. Since the drivers did not pack food, the drivers reasoned, Exemption F did not apply to them. Oakhurst argued that the phrase actually refers to two different activities: “packing for shipment” and “distribution.” As the drivers clearly engaged in the distribution of food, Exemption F did apply to them.

Based on the plain language of the statute, the district court ruled in favor of Oakhurst.

However, on appeal, the First Circuit found the statute ambiguous. And with no other way to resolve the ambiguity, the First Circuit accepted the drivers’ narrower construction of the exemption and reversed the district court’s original ruling.

Federal law dictates that hourly (nonexempt) workers must be paid overtime for every hour worked over 40 hours in their work week. Regardless of these laws, some employers try to get creative and use illegal tactics to avoid paying workers overtime pay, 1.5 times their usual hourly rate.

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A Miami-Dade County employer that sells SIM cards for cellphones is accused of terminating an employee in retaliation for his complaints about not receiving overtime pay.

The man filed a complaint on behalf of similarly situated individuals on March 9 in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida.

According to the complaint, the man alleges that he began working for the company to sell SIM cards in November 2015 and was unlawfully terminated in December 2016. He holds the company responsible because they allegedly terminated his employment in retaliation to his complaints about not being paid any overtime wages. He also alleges he was not paid commissions as promised.

Employees are commonly hesitant to report unlawful conduct in the workplace, including wage and hour violations. Many fear that if they take any such action, they will be fired or suffer other consequences.

Retaliation is defined as “an adverse action taken against a covered individual because he or she engaged in a protected activity.” Employer retaliation can take many forms and can include the following:

  • Termination
  • Denied Promotion
  • Demotion
  • Reduction in compensation
  • Reduction in hours
  • Unwarranted discipline

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Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen will pay $140,000 to 185 interns who worked for their fashion brand to settle a wage theft lawsuit filed in 2015, according to court documents filed in Manhattan Federal Court.

Each intern will receive a $530 payment from the former child star twins and the rest of the money will cover lawyers’ fees, if approved by a judge.

The 31-year-old sisters are worth more than $300 million.

The former interns, who filed the suit against the Olsens’ Dualstar Entertainment company, claimed that they should have been paid minimum wage plus overtime, because they were doing the kind of work their paid colleagues had done but without compensation.

 

One of the unpaid interns said she clocked 50 hours a week between May 2012 and September 2012 at the company. Her responsibilities included inputting data into spreadsheets, making tech sheets, running personal errands for paid employees, organizing materials, cleaning, photocopying and sewing, according to court documents.

The Olsens founded Dualstar when they were just 6. The company makes everything from videos, books and dolls to cosmetics and clothes. They started their fashion brand The Row in 2006.

All employees have a right to be paid at least minimum wage for the work they perform. In Florida, the current minimum wage is $8.10. Unpaid internships get a little tricky in the eyes of the law. The United States Department of Labor has set the following criteria for unpaid internships:

  1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment;
  2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern;
  3. The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff;
  4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded;
  5. The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and
  6. The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.

If every single one of the factors listed above are met, an employment relationship does not exist under the FLSA, and the Act’s minimum wage and overtime provisions do not apply to the intern.

If you are currently an unpaid intern, or have completed an unpaid internship, and you think you are/were an actual employee, our Florida Unpaid Wage & Overtime Lawyers at Whittel & Melton can help. We will investigate the facts of your case and if we feel you have a valid claim, we will push to get you the fair financial compensation you deserve.

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According to a new study, men have been as likely to move into predominantly female jobs as the other way around over the last 15 years, but not all men.

It is the men who are already disadvantaged in the labor market: black, Hispanic, less educated, poor and immigrant men.

While work done by women continues to be valued less, the study demonstrates, job opportunities divide not just along gender lines but also by race and class.

At the same time, the women who have continued to delve into more prestigious male-dominated professions in that period are likely to be white, educated, native-born and married, according to the research, which has not been published yet.

The gender composition of jobs matters for reasons of equality — fields with a majority of men pay 21 percent more than those with mostly women. Also, the fastest-growing jobs are dominated by women, while the fastest-shrinking ones are predominantly male.

The jobs that have become more female are generally professional or managerial ones, according to the study.

More Female

Natural sciences managers

Veterinarians

Optometrists

Ushers and ticket takers

Brokerage clerks

Agricultural inspectors

Print binding and finishing workers

Dentists

Animal trainers

Agricultural and food scientists

Less Female

Computer operators

Counter and rental clerks

Radiation therapists

Inspectors and testers

New account clerks

Models and product promoters

Engine and machine assemblers

Electrical assemblers

Biological technicians

Furnace operators

Sex or gender discrimination in the workplace involves treating someone poorly because of their sex, whether they are applying for a job or are a current employee. While women can perform the same duties as men with the same skill and success, the issue of sex discrimination is still present in many workplaces and can hold women back. This is not to say that men cannot be discriminated against – in the past this has been predominantly an issue with women, but as times change and new studies like this one come out, it is clear that gender discrimination can equally be directed towards men.

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A Broward County man says his former employer did not pay for all of the overtime hours he worked as an insulation installer.

The man filed a complaint on Feb. 28. According to his complaint, between July 2014 and March 2017, he worked for more than 40 hours per week. He says the company failed to pay him any overtime premiums at a rate of time-and-one-half for working more than 40 hours per week. He added that he was terminated in retaliation for complaining about the practice.

No one wants to be duped out of their rightfully earned wages. As an employee, you work hard for your wages and expect that your employer will pay you any and all wages you are owed, including overtime pay.

If you know you earned overtime pay, but were denied overtime wages by your employer, you need to enlist the help of an Unpaid Overtime Lawyer at Whittel & Melton as soon as possible. We cannot stress enough how important it is to act fast in these cases. The longer you wait, the greater the risk of being unable to file a legitimate claim against your employer for unpaid wages.

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Almost 250 women and men are making sexual harassment claims against one of the nation’s largest jewelry companies, Sterling Jewelers, which operates under the name of Kay Jewelers and Jared the Galleria of Jewelry.

Claims of demeaning women and encouraging sexual discrimination are sweeping headlines.

Among the declarations, there are reports of a rape, male managers cavorting in a swimming pool with topless female employees at a mandatory manager’s conference and a witness who tells of a male manager suggesting that a female co-worker swipe a credit card between her breasts.

The declarations portray Sterling Jewelers as fostering a workplace where senior men treated young saleswomen as sexual objects, including groping, demeaning and demanding sex in return for better jobs and job security.

These declarations are part of a private class-action arbitration case first filed in 2008. It alleged female employees at the conglomerate were routinely sexually harassed, paid less and passed over for promotion at Sterling, which operates close to 1,500 stores in the United States.

There are statements that have come to light that describe top male managers at the company sending “scouting” parties to stores to find female staffers to target for sex.

The managers so frequently demanded sex from female workers in exchange for better positions within the company that there was an internal phrase for it called “going to the big stage.”

The class-action case includes 69,000 current and former females employees of Sterling.

Requests for sexual favors and physical conduct of a sexual nature are all forms of sexual harassment. If you are being harassed by being asked or told to perform sexual favors, call our Florida Sexual Harassment Lawyers at Whittel & Melton at 866-608-5529 to discuss your case. Your consultation is always free and everything discussed is kept fully confidential.

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The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has filed a discrimination lawsuit against Pioneer Health Services Inc., a healthcare company in rural Georgia, alleging it unlawfully discriminated against an employee due to her disability.

A social worker and therapist for Pioneer Health Services became ill in July 2012 and was hospitalized as a result of liver failure. She took medical leave from the company during this time. After her procedure, she was slated to return to work, however, she had postoperative complications. According to the EEOC, the woman asked Pioneer Health for an additional four weeks of leave. The company allegedly denied her request and fired her.

The EEOC district direct issued the following statement:

The ADA and Family and Medical Leave Act operate independently of each other. Where an employee has exhausted her FMLA leave and she requests additional leave, the employer must engage in the interactive process to determine whether additional leave under the ADA is warranted.

The EEOC seeks monetary damages, compensatory and punitive damages, and injunctive relief.

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